Tag Archives: networked practice

Social media activities to help crowdfund research (part 1) #deakin #pozible

Here is @bestqualitycrab at launch of the @pozible crowdfunding #research project. Only 6 wks ago...#deakin

@bestqualitycrab at launch of the @pozible crowdfunding #research project

An Im-Pozible-y Cool Project

Before the December break in 2012, Prof Deb Verhoeven (who is awesome and in my mind like an academic version of Sheryl Sandberg) asked me for a chat about a project she was working on. It turned out to be an innovative project to trial crowdfunding research in Australia, in collaboration with Pozible, the Australian Kickstarter counterpart . In development over about 2 years and with Pozible already in the market, her project was now coming together.

This end of year time is always so conducive to brainstorming, and we spent an enjoyable lunch thinking about what kind of projects could/might be succesful, what people would definitely not sponsor (eg academics flying to conferences in exotic locations…), what kind of social media and digital presence would be needed to be successful, and whether anyone would dare to take the plunge.

Well some very brave souls did, the project launched on 8 May and it has been quite the ride. Before I go any further, I'd like you all to go take a look at Research My World! Some of the projects have already reached their goals, but some are still looking for support to hit the mark by tomorrow!! (DO IT NOW!!!)

I've been so excited to be involved in this. It is a prime example of how technology

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A month of #Pomodoro #pom31

“When it comes to interacting with the world of always-on information, the fundamental skill, on which other essential skills depend, is the ability to deal with distraction without filtering out opportunity.” -Howard Rheingold

As knowledge workers, our social (or learning) networks are like oxygen. We need the information streams they provide, to survive. As Dr Inger Mewburn, aka Thesiswhisperer, recently said in her #PLEConf keynote and blog post, these practices are “the work you do in order to do the work you do.” That applies whatever your learning and information environment of choice is; Twitter, Yammer, Facebook, LinkedIn, email or any combination of those. They are indispensable.

However, being dependent on those enticing, rich, abundant, omnipresent, (can we even say addictive?) information streams, does indeed mean that the ability to deal with distraction, as Howard Rheingold says, becomes a key skill.

I find that I am good at one facet of this skill: setting up appropriate filters so I don’t miss out on the opportunities provided. However, I would like to be better at another part: attention or “time on task”. Continue reading

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One way to grow a networked teacher, is to grow a networked learner #pln

In my new role as Lecturer in Blended Learning, a part of my role is staff development. Staff development has always been a part of my roles, both in how do you do staff development in a networked world?

It was one of the big questions at the national AITD conference on training and development where I was invited to be a keynote. Much of the discussion in the keynotes and sessions where how traditional trainers/developers could adapt their traditional approaches capitalise on working and training in a networked world and in networked organisations.

Some issues overheard:

  • Traditional training is unpopular. Staff don’t want to give up time/other activities.
  • Traditional training lacks the ability to customize, not personal, not just-in-time
  • Not every trainer is an expert in every aspect of the company’s operations
  • How do you measure networked staff development?
  • How do you measure your contribution to organisation, if you can’t tick off training sessions, coaching interventions, resources created…
  • Senior management need convincing on the power of networked organisations
  • There will never be enough IT trainers to help everyone

And even though I wouldn’t call most higher education institutions networked organisations just yet, there are nascent networks inside them. These will become more important as the impact of the networked, information abundant world on this sector grows (as it has with the music, publishing and newspaper industries). Networked organisations are more flexible and adaptable. And so we as academic developers can look through the lense of the T&D professionals and see that we struggle with the same issues.

A networked professional has a Personal Learning Network

I’ve long thought that it is impossible to truly assess the potential of networked technologies for learning, when you only learn about them in a 2 hour workshop.

I’ve done many a Twitter, LMS (Moodle, Blackboard, etc), Facebook workshop and the traction is… Continue reading

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